Awards

KS Yang Travel Award

KS Yang Travel Award History

Professor Kuo-shu Yang is the founder of indigenous Chinese psychology. He has worked his entire career promoting the development of psychology indigenous to Asia, and set up this fund through generous contributions from individuals in Taiwan.

In recognition of the huge range of conditions facing social psychologists across different countries in Asia, Professor Yang established an endowment to enable young scholars in economically developing countries to attend the AASP conference.

Hence, the KS Yang Travel Award is administered by AASP to provide financial assistance for deserving young scholars from developing countries to attend the biennual conference.

KS Yang Travel Award Grant

AASP has designated the KS Yang travel award to provide financial assistance for deserving young scholars from developing countries to attend the AASP Conference.

In 2005, AASP provided ONE all expenses paid trip (travel, registration fees, and accommodation) to the most deserving applicant.

In addition, it may be possible that some lesser awards will be made.

How to apply for the KS Yang Travel Award

Applicants of less than 40 years of age from any developing nation are eligible.

In addition to the normal procedure of submitting an abstract for the conference, KS Yang award applicants should also supply.

  1. their Curriculum Vitae (CV) detailing their publications and teaching activities,
  2. a full copy of the paper they intend to present, and
  3. a letter of recommendation from a more senior colleague.

The length of this paper should be between 4,000-6,000 words.

Winning papers will be submitted for publication in 'Contributions to Asian Social Psychology' (AASP's conference proceedings).

Park Jung-heun & Jung Tae-gon Young Scholar Awards

Park Jung-heun Young Scholar Award History

The Park Jung-heun Young Scholar Award was established to provide financial travel assistance for young Asian psychologists to attend the Biennial Conference of the Asian Association of Social Psychology.

Jung Tae-gon Young Scholar Award supports young scholars from economically developing countries to participate in the AASP conference.

Park Jung-heun & Jung Tae-gon Award Grants

The recipients of the Young Scholar Award will receive a plaque, certificate, $500 to cover travel expenses to attend the AASP conference, and the cost of registration. The awards will be given during the biennial conference of AASP.

Park Jung-heun Young Scholar Award will be given to two young scholars from Asia.

Jung Tae-gon Young Scholar Award will be given to two young scholars from economically developing countries in Asia (excluding Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and Singapore).

How to apply for the Park Jung-heun and Jung Tae-gon Awards

Applicants should have completed or be near completion of their doctoral dissertation and should be below the age of 40. The winning papers will be considered for the AASP publication, Progress in Asian Social Psychology.

Interested applicants should submit the following:

  • a 5-page summary (1,500 words) of their dissertation or research paper to a selection committee comprising four AASP past-presidents.
  • a Curriculum Vitae, and
  • a letter of recommendation.

JH Park Young Scholar Award and TG Jung Young Scholar Award

JH Park Young Scholar Award and TG Jung Young Scholar Award will be provided to applicants who are graduate students or those who have recently completed their Ph.D. dissertation, below the age of 35 and who do not hold a permanent position. 

Each recipient of the JH Park and TG Jung Young Scholar Award will receive a certificate, $300 to cover travel expenses to attend the AASP conference, and a gift. Awardees must attend the conference to receive the award. 

Procedure

Interested applicants need to submit 5-8-page research summary of their dissertation or research paper in which they are the principal investigator and which they will present at the AASP conference. Applicants should also submit their Curriculum Vitae, and a letter of recommendation. A selection committee comprising of AASP past-presidents will review the applications. The winning papers will be considered for the publication in the Progress in Asian Social Psychology Series.   

Deadline for submission is PUT DATE HERE. Applicants will be informed of the decision by PUT DATE HERE

Enquiries and/or applications should be submitted electronically to Prof. Uichol Kim:

Uichol Kim, Ph.D.
College of Business Administration 
Inha University, 253 Yonghyun-dong Nam-gu
Inchon, 402-751, Korea
E-mail: uicholk@yahoo.com; uicholk@chol.com

NOTE: INDIVIDUALS MAY APPLY FOR MORE THAN ONE AWARD. HOWEVER, ONLY  ONE AWARD WILL BE GIVEN PER PERSON.

Misumi Award

Misumi Award History

Misumi Award is established jointly by the Japanese Group Dynamics Association and the Asian Association for Social Psychology in honor of Professor Jyuji Misumi, a long time president of JGDA who made great contributions to the development of social psychology in Asia.

The award is given to the author(s) of the article in the Asian Journal of Social Psychology of which contribution to the development of social psychology in Asia is most prominent.

The selection committee consists of five members. Three are recommended by the Japanese Group Dynamics Association, and two by the Asian Association for Social Psychology.

Misumi Award Grant

The Award is granted each year. The ceremony for granting the Award and the prize of $1,000 takes place at the Conference of the Asian Association of Social Psychology.

One paper is selected for the Misumi Award each year from the papers published in the previous year's volume of the Asian Journal of Social Psychology. The selection procedure is:

  1. Each committee member nominates up to two papers as candidates for the Award. The commitee member cannot nominate or vote for any paper writen by him/her self or his/her direct students, or whose senior author has already received the Misumi Award.
  2. A list of nominated papers is distributed to the committee members. Each committee member evaluates each paper in the list on a five point scale (five being the highest score). Members do not evaluate papers where they may have a conflict of interest.
  3. The Japanese Group Dynamics Association distributes a list of average scores of the nominated papers (without the authors' names and the titles) to the members.
  4. The committee decides how many papers (up to a maximum of 3) to select as the final candidates of the Award, based on the average scores.
  5. The committee discusses the shortlisted papers and each member ranks the final candidates. The paper that receives the highest average score on the final vote is selected for the Award

How to apply for the Misumi Award

All papers published in the Asian Journal of Social Psychology are eligible for the Misumi Award.

Misumi Award Winners

2015 – Young-Hoon Kim, Chi-Yue Chiu, Sinhae Cho, Evelyn W. M. Au and Sunyoung Nicole Kwak (2013). Aligning inside and outside perspectives of the self: A cross-cultural difference in self-perception. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 17(x),

2014 – Hirofumi Hashimoto and Toshio Yamagishi. (2012). Two faces of interdependence: Harmony seeking and rejection avoidance. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 16(x),

2013 – Toshio Yamagishi, Hirofumi Hashimoto, Karen S. Cook, Toko Kiyonari, Mizuho, Shinada, Nobuhiro Mifune, Keigo Inukai, Haruto Takagishi, Yutaka Horita & Li Yang (2012). Modesty in self-presentation: A comparison between the USA and Japan. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 15(x),

2012 – Nobuhiko Goto & Minoru Karasawa (2011). Identification with a wrongful subgroup and the feeling of collective guilt. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 14(x),

2011 Wolfgang Wagner, Nicole Kronberger, Motohiko Nagata, Ragini Sen, Peter Holtz and Fátima Flores Palacios (2010). Essentialist theory of 'hybrids': From animal kinds to ethnic categories and race. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 13(4), 232-246.

2010 Yoshihisa Kashima, Paul Bain, Nick Haslam, Kim Peters, Simon Laham, Jennifer Whelan, Brock Bastian, Stephen Loughnan, Leah Kaufmann and Julian Fernando (2009). Folk theory of social change. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 12 (4), 227-246.

2009 James H. Liu, Li-Li Huang, Catherine McFedries (2008). Cross-sectional and longitudinal differences in social dominance orientation and right wing authoritarianism as a function of political power and societal change. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 11 (2), 116-126.

2008Kenji Noguchi (2007). Examination of the content of individualism/collectivism scales in cultural comparisons of the USA and Japan. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 10 (3), 131-144.

2007Yuriko Zemba (2006). Responses to organizational harm: Mechanism of blaming managers as proxies for a culpable organization. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 9 (3), 184–194.
Elizabeth A. Hardie, Christine Crichley & Zoe Morris (2006). Self-coping complexity: Role of self-construal in relational, individual and collective coping styles and health outcomes. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 9(3), 224-235.

2006Sau-Lai Lee, Chi-Yue Chiu & Tsz-Kit Chan (2005). Some boundary conditions of the expressor culture effect in emotion recognition: Evidence from Hong Kong Chinese perceivers. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 8(3), 224-243.

2005Li-Li Huang, James H. Liu, & Maanling Chang (2004). The double identity' of Taiwanese Chinese: A dilemma of politics and culture rooted in history. Asian Journal of Social Psychology Vol. 7, Issue 2.
Michael W. Morris, Kwok Leung, & Sheena S. Iyengar (2004). Person perception in the heat of conflict: Negative trait attributions affect procedural preferences and account for situational and cultural differences. Asian Journal of Social Psychology Vol. 7, Issue 2.

2004Kuang-Hui Yeh, & Olwen Bedford (2003). A test of the Dual Filial Piety model. Asian Journal of Social Psychology Vol. 6, Issue 3.

2003Liu J. H., Lawrence B., Ward C., & Abraham S. (2002). Social representations of history in Malaysia and Singapore: On the relationship between national and ethnic identity. Asian Journal of Social Psychology Vol. 5, Issue 1.

2002David Matsumoto & Cenita Kupperbusch (2001). Idiocentric and allocentric differences in emotional expression, experience, and the coherence between expression and experience. Asian Journal of Social Psychology Vol. 4, Issue 2.

2001James S. Uleman, Eun Rhee, Nenshad Bardoliwalla, Gun Semin & Midori Toyama (2000). The relational self: Closeness to ingroups depends on who they are, culture, and the type of closeness. Asian Journal of Social Psychology Vol. 3, Issue 1.
Sik Hung Ng, Cynthia S. F. Loong, James H. Liu & Ann Weatherall (2000). Will the young support the old? An individual-and family-level study of filial obligations in two New Zealand cultures. Asian Journal of Social Psychology Vol. 3, Issue 2.

2000Takano, Y. & Osaka, E. (1999). An unsupported common view: Comparing Japan and the U.S. on individualism/collectivism. Asian Journal of Social Psychology Vol. 2, Issue 3.

1999Yamaguchi, S. (1998). Biased risk perceptions. Asian Journal of Social Psychology Vol. 1, Issue 2.

 
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